Monthly Archives: August 2012

Remembering the wizard

Let’s not forget the one man who lived during times when sportsmen were meant to be forgotten, the three times Olympic gold medalist from India – who died penniless. Today is a very important day for sportsmen in India – 29th of August is instituted as National Sports Day as it happens to be the birthday of legendary Indian hockey wizard Major Dhyan Chand. Read my latest article in the NRI

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A hungry future?

More than half of the children of India who are under four years of age face a debilitating future because of malnutrition. Over 60 per cent of Indian women, irrespective of class, are anemic. In 50 per cent of the 2.1 million annual deaths of children under five years of age, the underlying cause is malnutrition. And then we have inflation. I often wonder where have we gone wrong? What’s the way out? Continue reading

A year of revenge

No matter how cognitively we evolve, revenge remains one of humans’ most primal instincts. The need to inflict suffering and punishment on those who have wronged us goes back to our days in the dark old caves. While revenge may be subtle or loud, cinema has always glorified it. Interestingly some of the best Bollywood films of 2012 so far – namely Agneepath, Pan Singh Tomar, Kahani, and the Gangs of Wasseypur saga – are all revenge films. Continue reading

Is android free?

We live in a time when 371,000 babies are born daily. This is minuscule when compared to 378,000 iPhones and 1.1 million PCs sold, and the 1 million Android devices that are activated daily. The rise of Android in less than 4 years of its release is shocking. While Android markets itself as free and open source, it must be understood and questioned – to what extent does Android respect the freedom of its users? Continue reading

The legacy of Capt. Lakshmi Sehgal

Capt. Lakshmi Sehgal, in each stage of her life, represented a stage of her political evolution – from a young medical student drawn to the freedom struggle; as the leader of the all-woman Rani of Jhansi regiment of the Indian National Army; as a doctor, who restarted her medical practice in Kanpur amidst refugees and the most marginalized sections of society; and finally, as a an activist fighting for political, economic and social justice. Continue reading