Monthly Archives: March 2010

Too many Ramayanas- focus on characters

In my previous post, I had mentioned that there exist many versions of Ramayana, and confronting one over the other will only narrow down our perspective and eventually lead to great cultural loss. Continue reading

Too many Ramayanas- the doordarshan impact

January 25, 1987, to July 31, 1988- the period when Ramanand Sagar’s Ramayana was aired on Doordarshan. This show rose to hold the world record of being the world’s most viewed mythological serial. It was primarily based on Valmiki’s Ramayana and Tulsidas’ Ramcharitmanas. It is also partly derived from portions of Kamban’s Kambaramayanam. The televised Ramayana did, however, disturb some observers, who worried that the Doordarshan version might come to dominate other tellings of the story. Among them was Romila Thapar. Continue reading

Too many Ramayanas- prologue

Have you heard Aristotle’s story of the carpenter’s knife? When asked to an old carpenter how long he had possessed his knife, he answered- “I’ve had it for 30 years. I have changed the blade a few times and the handle a few times, but it’s the same knife.” Similar is the case with the epic Ramayana. Continue reading

Shaheed Bhagat Singh’s statement before the lahore high court bench

Tomorrow is 23rd March, the day of martyrdom of the great son of India. I have posted a series of his speeches and writings. This is the speech he delivered before the Lahore high court. Through this brilliant statement he demolished the basis of the Sessions Court judgment and emphasized the importance of motive. The motive of action, he argued, should be the main consideration while judging the offense of an accused. Continue reading

Shaheed Bhagat Singh on the slogan ‘Long Live Revolution’

Tomorrow is 23rd March, the day of martyrdom of the great son of India. I have posted a series of his speeches and writings. Shri Ramanand Chaterji the editor of Modern Review, ridiculed the slogan of ‘Long Live Revolution’ through an editorial note and gave an entirely wrong interpretation. Bhagat Singh wrote a reply and handed it over to the trying magistrate to be sent to Modern Review. This was published in The Tribune of December 24, 1929. Continue reading